Competition details

#cybersafeqld

Everyone who uses the Internet creates a trail of data; this includes websites visited, emails sent and even posts that are liked. This trail of data is called a 'digital footprint'. Data used to identify a user, such as; date of birth, search activities and usernames and passwords, form a 'digital identity' that is used to authenticate a user's identity. This data needs to be kept private to increase security and prevent identity theft.

How will you help Queenslanders to use technology appropriately and responsibly to protect their digital footprint and digital identity?

Develop an app, game, animation, website or robotic prototype. Winners receive prizes of coding and robotic kits (total prize pool $10,000). Enter as an individual or as a pair.

What do I need to do?

Create some interactive and innovative coding to raise awareness of cybersafety, and help Queenslanders improve their cybersafety. It could be an app, a game, an animation, a website, or a robotic solution. Your prototype should be visually appealing, informative and help Queenslanders to be cybersafe. Create your own images, or download and provide credit for appropriate images (if permissible under its terms and conditions of use) to use in your digital solution.

Primary (Years 3-6) - Game, app, animation or robotic prototype.

  • Create an interactive digital solution that educates the user about cybersafety and provides tips to improve their cybersafety.
  • Use Scratch/Tynker or a programming platform that is either free or free for educational purposes.

Secondary (Years 7-10) - Game, app, website or robotic prototype.

  • Create an innovative digital solution that could be developed into a fully functional aid to raise awareness or help Queenslanders improve their cybersafety.
  • Use Python/JavaScript/HTML or a programming platform that is either free or free for educational purposes.

Entry Specifications

Entries must be produced using a programming platform that is either free or free for educational purposes.

Entries will be assessed against a set of selection criteria by a panel of judges from government, education and industry.

A valid coding challenge entry must have two components:

  1. A prototype of a digital solution to the challenge. You must submit your code (by uploading via (eAwards) in accordance with the applicable instructions on that site) so it may be easily compiled by the panel of judges, including specifying the language or application used when creating your digital solution:
    • Scratch - upload the SB2/SB3 file for your prototype.
    • Tynker - copy and paste the share link into a text file and upload the text file.
    • Text-based code (e.g. Python or JavaScript) - submit as a text file.
    • HTML entries - submit one zipped folder containing all folders, pages, and images.  Hot-linked images will not be accepted.
    • All other entries - you are reminded to submit your code so it may be easily compiled by the panel of judges, including specifying the language or application used when creating your digital solution. 
  2. A video of no more than 90 seconds in duration demonstrating your digital solution.
    • The video should be no more than 120MB in size to be uploaded to eAwards.
    • Entrants are required to keep and store a high-resolution version of their video that can be used if they are selected as a winner.
    • Recommended format for video files: .mpg .avi .mov .mp4